AN IMPORTANT LESSON I LEARNED ON THE “MONKEY BARS” – when I was 7 years old

By Carole Martin
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It didn’t take more than one or two falls before I learned one of life’s important lessons. That lesson applies today just as it did when I was 7 years old.

“While swinging from bar-to bar on the gym set –
don’t let go of one bar before you have a firm grip on the bar in front of you.”

The same principal applies to JOB SEARCH –

“While searching for a new job – don’t let go of the old job, if you can help it, before you are sure you have a firm offer from the next job.”

As with the “monkey bars,” when you let go of the bar before you have a firm grasp on the next bar or ring, you will fall to the ground – and be unemployed.

When you are searching for a new job, for whatever reason, you should think about applying the same principle. You’re stressed, bored, burned out in your current job. It happens!

So, you become disenchanted and de-motivated, for whatever reason. You make a decision that is time to leave.  OK, but what’s your plan?

Two things usually happen at this stage, you start coming in late, making mistakes, and your performance and attitude go downhill.

It is difficult to job search while holding down a job – that’s a given. But, when you venture to let go of your current job without having another job to go to, you could become unemployed – and that is not good.

A recruiter once told me, they called an unemployed person – “distressed merchandise.” You know those tables at the stores that are marked down because they didn’t sell well? Well, that’s “distressed merchandise.”

If you make the decision that you are going to leave your job – for whatever reason, be sure to have a plan and a goal in mind.

First of all, have a good “heart-to-heart” talk with yourself, and convince yourself that you are going to get a grip, and you are going to change your negative attitude. When you know that something is “temporary” it is easier to get through the stress that is dragging you down. This won’t be easy, but is possible to pull off.

Next, start networking, searching online, applying for the job “you really want.” A good exercise at this point is to do a values exercise. What do you want? Is it attainable, or will you have to get more education or training?

Just remember, have the ring in sight and, if possible, a firm grip on your current ring before you let go of what you are holding on to.

Do a quick check up on your values -Free Values Exercise -

http://interviewcoach.com/valuesexercise.html

You are solely responsible for your success or failure

By Carole Martin

images At the end of the day, you are solely responsible for your success and your failure. And the sooner you realize that, you accept that, and integrate that into your work ethic, you will start being successful. As long as you blame others for the reason you aren’t where you want to be, you will always be a failure. ― Erin Cummings

“NEWCOMER” Job Fair – ANYONE – new to the area from immigrants to new move-ins.

By Carole Martin

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JOB FAIR ADVICE

  1. Check websites to see announcements of local job fairs. They will give you dates, locations, websites, directions, and contact information.
  2. Check out which companies will be attending the job fair. Select those that are of interest to you and visit their website. What do you see that fits your qualifications?
  3. Time is of the essence. Lay out a plan to move quickly around the site, making sure you contact those of particular interest.
  4. Make sure your resume is in-line with what they are seeking – is it clearly stated?
  5. Take several copies of your resume with you to the job fair.
  6. Dress professionally, and in accordance with the job you are seeking. A non-management job does not require a suit, unless it is a particularly traditional or conservative company.
  7. Plan to arrive early – at least a half hour prior to the starting time.
  8. Upon arrival at the site, get a floor plan map – usually given at the entrance or information table. Or, better yet, there may be computers there for your use to look up participant’s locations and more company information.
  9. Time is of the essence. Lay out a plan to move quickly around the site, making sure you contact those of particular interest. Visit the sites that have the fewest visitors, even though they would not be your first choice. Keep your focus and make contact with as many companies of interest as possible.
  10. Be enthusiastic, upbeat, and above all, be prepared to tell them what you are looking for, and what you have to offer.

More Information:
“NEWCOMER” Job Fair – ANYONE – new to the area from immigrants to new move-ins.
https://www.abbynews.com/community/newcomers-fair-offers-job-search-tips-settlement-info-and-more/
#jobtips #jobfair #jobs

“At the end of the day, you are solely responsible for your success and your failure. And the sooner you realize that, you accept that, and integrate that into your work ethic, you will start being successful. As long as you blame others for the reason you aren’t where you want to be, you will always be a failure.”

2018 RULE IN CALIFORNIA –

By Carole Martin
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Starting the first of the year, job seekers in California will have one less section to fill out on applications and one less interview question to worry about as they meet with potential employers.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a salary privacy bill into law last week, making it illegal for employers to ask job applicants about their former salaries and benefits, The Orange County Register reports. The law goes into effect January 1.

This is good news for everyone who believes they shouldn’t be judged based on how much money they made in the past.

Laws prohibiting employers from asking about salary history have already been passed in Massachusetts, Oregon and Delaware, The Orange County Register reports.The newspaper also noted several cities, including New York City, San Francisco, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, have done the same.
More Information
https://www.thepennyhoarder.com/make-money/salary-history-law-california/

Word for word: Phone interviews are extremely important in today’s job market

By Carole Martin

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Marco Buscaglia, Tribune Content AgencyCareerBuilder
Rarely used even a decade ago, the phone job interview is now a critical tool for today’s recruiters. A strong phone interview can help narrow down applicants to a select handful that will be brought in later for a face-to-face interview. While the phone interview may seem like a casual first step, it’s not. In fact, it’s an important part of the process. More importantly, the phone interview is an entirely different beast from a face-to-face encounter; without the benefit of eye contact, body language and other visual cues, what you say and how you say it become even more important.
If you have a phone interview in your future, here are a few things to remember:
–Pay attention: Turn off the music in the background, put Snapchat on hold and focus on the call at hand. If you’re interviewing from home and have a dog, put him in the yard so your interview isn’t interrupted by a barrage of barking each time someone walks in front of your house. You shouldn’t have any distractions. “Pay complete, total and full attention to the person on the other end of the line, as if you were staring them in the eye,” says Karen Friedman, a communications coach in Blue Bell, Pa. “People can read and feel your body language across the miles, so act as if they are in the room with you so they can feel your energy, presence and attention.”
–Stay alert: Don’t lounge on the coach or take the call in bed. In fact, don’t sit, if possible. Get on your feet and show some signs of life. April Callis, author of “Springboard to Success” (Springboard, $19.95), asserts that standing up will help you stay focused. “It will give you more energy in your voice if you stand,” says Callis. “Also, smile while you talk so that you sound friendly and enthused.”
-Be clear: When you talk on the phone, is the person on the other end of the line constantly saying “What?” or “Huh?” If so, we’re talking to you — the low talker who thinks it’s OK to use his or her NPR voice, even when a new job is on the line. When you’re on the phone, you’ll need to speak even more precisely than you might in person. “Pronounce your words clearly and don’t trail off at the end of a sentence,” says Friedman. “You want to make sure you are heard and understood. Additionally, pause to give the person on the other end of the line a chance to digest what you are saying and to participate in the conversation.”
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Job market growth – see the strong markets and the slower markets.

https://www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/Pages/Strong-US-Labor-Market-Con…

Great book

By Carole Martin

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You are the best, Carole. I got another book, “Boost Your Interview IQ”. This is an excellent book – You have provided sample answers and then explained which one is strongest and weakest! Impressed. Thanks a ton from the core of my heart.
Is PDF version of the book available in the market? If yes, I’ll buy immediately to enable me to download in my Ipad and add comments, annotate and highlight relevant information.